Killer T cells could ignite immune response against cancer: study

Research brings cancer-killing cells to bear against a certain type of colorectal cancer tumour

Killer T cells could ignite immune response against cancer: studyA University of Alberta researcher has discovered how two signalling molecules recruit immune cells known as killer T cells to a specific type of colon cancer with more favourable patient outcomes. The finding may represent a therapeutic strategy to target other types of cancers. Kristi Baker, assistant professor in the Department of Oncology, examined tumours…

Engineer credits Schulich scholarship for launching aerospace career

Kirtan Dhunnoo credits the scholarship for giving him incredible experiences and job-ready skills

Engineer credits Schulich scholarship for launching aerospace careerEven as a student at Edmonton’s Strathcona High School back in 2014, Kirtan Dhunnoo had a keen understanding of the potential for leadership in each of us. “Not only are there leaders by labels, but there are leaders by virtue of their widely different personalities,” he wrote in his application for a Schulich Leader Scholarship.…

O’Toole has a serious credibility problem

And once you’ve lost your credibility it’s very hard to grow it back

O’Toole has a serious credibility problemIn politics, nothing is more important than credibility. Politicians can deliver stirring speeches and launch searing attack ads, but if they don’t tell the truth, nobody believes any of it. And, one way or another, voters will hold them accountable. After our “election about nothing,” Erin O’Toole has a serious credibility problem. Take his flip-flop…

Ford can learn from O’Toole shortcomings

Lesson No. 1: Don't crumble in the face of focus-group gurus

Ford can learn from O’Toole shortcomingsThe Conservative Party’s defeat in the recent federal election offers important lessons for Ontario Premier Doug Ford. Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole chose to abandon core principles to try to win an election. Long-standing stances on carbon taxes, balanced budgets and broad-based tax relief crumbled in the face of focus-group gurus. Politicians have been trying to…

New device may improve life for people who have breathing challenges

Developers working to get it to market

New device may improve life for people who have breathing challengesA University of Alberta engineering duo is getting a boost from the university’s newly formed commercialization engine, imYEG, to get a new device for people with breathing challenges to market. Medical devices that assist people who have a low level of oxygen in their blood have evolved from large stationary tanks of compressed oxygen to…

The cities are taking over Canadian politics

Recognizing the political power of Canadian cities has become a core element of national politics

The cities are taking over Canadian politicsThe parsing of the federal election results is underway, as Canadians seek insights into leadership, party fortunes, regional concerns, and the priorities of special interest groups. This process often exposes major currents in Canada’s political culture and provides the country with a glimpse into what lies ahead. In my view, a major focus should be…

Taxing savers is not the solution to Canada’s economic woes

Governments have to stop giving in to populist pressures

Taxing savers is not the solution to Canada’s economic woesNow that the federal election is over, several financial sector experts and economists are turning their attention to the Trudeau government’s promise to raise the corporate income tax rate for banks and insurance companies from 15 per cent to 18 per cent. But while attacking these financial giants can pay off politically, the fact is…

Five things we all need to know about reconciliation in health care

First Indigenous president of the Canadian Medical Association speaks about what it will take to overcome inequities

Five things we all need to know about reconciliation in health careOn Canada’s newly-declared National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, we asked Dr. Alika Lafontaine to take stock of the state of reconciliation in health care. Lafontaine, an anesthesiologist at Queen Elizabeth II Hospital in Grande Prairie and associate clinical professor in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, was recently chosen as the…

U of A researcher part of team receiving $2 million to fight overdose epidemic

National Overdose Response Service provides safety, dignity and support to drug users anywhere in Canada

U of A researcher part of team receiving $2 million to fight overdose epidemicCOVID-19 social isolation is one of the main causes of Canada’s overdose epidemic. Each day there are up to 17 overdoses in Canada and two to four in Alberta. The vast majority of overdoses occur when people use alone. Monty Ghosh, a physician and assistant professor at the University of Alberta and the University of…

COVID-19 underscores ‘invisible pandemic’ of diet-related diseases

Public policies can help support better individual choices

COVID-19 underscores ‘invisible pandemic’ of diet-related diseasesThe COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light both weaknesses and opportunities in the way public policies can support children’s long-term health, according to the seventh and final Alberta Nutrition Report Card on Food Environments for Children and Youth, released recently. “Kids eat what’s available to them, what’s affordable and readily accessible,” said principal investigator Kim…